The LMS “Patriot” Class 4-6-0 in North West England

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These 52 locomotives had a Quite varied history, and although they can be considered as being introduced in 1930, under the supervision of Henry Fowler, they were based on the ex-LNWR ‘Claughton’ class 4-6-0, and officially described as rebuilds. In Fowler’s Patriot design of 1930, some locomotives retained the wheels and other chassis details of the ‘Claughton’ design. The intermediate traffic types so produced were also known as the “Baby Scot” class, and the similarity in design of the parallel boiler versions was unmistakeable.

Leading Dimensions;

Introduced; ………………………………. 1930/1946*

Designer; ………………………………….. Sir Henry Fowler

Built; …………………………………………Crewe

Power class; …………………………………5XP, later 6P5F, 6P and lastly 7P*

Coupled wheel dia.; ……………………….6ft 9ins

Cylinders; ……………………………………(3) 18ins x 26ins / (3) 17ins x 26ins*

Boiler pressure; …………………………….200 p.s.i. / 250 p.s.i.*

Tractive effort; ……………………………..26,520 Ibs / 29,570 Ibs*

Weight (W.O.); ……………………………… 80 tons 15 cwt / 82 tons 15 cwt*

B.R. No. series; …………………………….. 45500-45551

* These figures refer to the rebuilt locomotives the locos rebuilt from 1946 were;   45512/14/21-3/25-32/4-6/40/5 (18)

By the time British Railways had taken over ownership, further work on the class had resulted in the appearance of a number of engines with the LMS No. 2A boiler, and double blastpipe and chimney, under the direction of H.G. Ivatt. The intention overall was to modify the three classes of Patriot, Jubilee and Royal Scot 4 -6-0, in such a way that they became one class. The weight of the rebuilt Patriot 4-6-0 went up by two tons, with the heavier boiler; but with new cylinders and working pressure increased to 250 p.s.i., an improvement of 4,000 Ibs on tractive effort was made.

The parallel boiler engines still represented the majority, and the classification of 5XP was maintained for a time by B.R., though this was soon altered to 6P5F, and the solitary Claughton class 46004 remained as 5XP in 1948. Oddly, this particular loco was rebuilt with a large Belpaire boiler some twenty years earlier – the forerunner of the design for the class; though it retained four cylinders compared with the Patriot’s three. In addition, where the drive for the Walschaerts valve gear was all to the leading axle in the Claughton, the Patriot development had divided drive. Sadly perhaps, the last remaining Claughton was scrapped even before it was able to carry the BR number allotted.

The 52 Patriots were residents of the North West for the greater part of their lives – in 1950 only seven could be seen outside this area, at Willesden, Camden and Bushbury. Most were stabled at Crewe North and Carlisle Upperby, and the position was much the same by the mid fifties, although Holyhead and Warrington had lost their allocations. Longsight and Edge Hill still maintained a number, but with the increasing use of diesels in the late fifties, and the expansion of electrification, suitable work was beginning to disappear. By 1964, only five remained in service, four of which were shared between Carlisle Upperby and Kingmoor sheds, whilst Holyhead retained 45530. None were in service at January 1st 1967.

A further characteristic of these North West steam types was the naming of a number after some of the region’s seaside resorts – Rhyl, Blackpool, Southport, Fleetwood, etc. Not all the class were named, and other links with the former LNWR Claughton class 4-6-0 could be seen in the names “Patriot” itself and “E.Tootal Broadhurst”, amongst others, formerly carried by LNWR locos.

Being a passenger type, in LMS days they were turned out in the fully lined crimson lake livery, whilst B.R. had applied the express passenger lined green, which was carried for the greater part of their remaining service life.

Allocations;


(i)1950;

5A Crewe North;         45502-4/6/7/10/1/3/23/8/9/35/43/6/8

7C Holyhead:               45534

8A Edge Hill;                 45515/27/31/3/8

8B Warrington;            45521

9A Longsight:
                45500/1/20/30/6/9/40

10B Preston;
                45508/16/9/37/44/7

12A Carlisle Upperby;   45505/12/7/8/25/6/42/9-51

(ii) 1954;

5A Crewe North;         45503/4/6/7/10/3/6/24/8/9/35/43/4/7/8

8A Edge Hill;                 45515/8/21/5/7/31/3/4/8/50

9A Longsight;               45500/1/20/30/6/9/40

10B Preston;
                45519

12A Carlisle Upperby;   45502/5/8/12/26/37/41/2/9/51

(iii) 1964;

6J Holyhead;                 45530

12A Carlisle Kingmoor; 45527/31

12B Carlisle Upperby;   45512/26

the-leicesterhsire-regiment-at-barrow

This view of the Crewe North engine 45503 entering Barrow Central station, c. 1956, shows an unrebuilt engine In B.R. lined green livery. The Midland Railway ancestry of the design, through Sir Henry Fowler is obvious, With the straight sided 3500 gallon tender and cut away cab Side sheets, as on the larger Royal Scot Class 4-6-0. The engine was named “The Leicestershire Regiment”.

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